Categories
Anthropocene

Humanity is cursed

“Life is a constant process of dying.”
― Arthur Schopenhauer

I’ll make this brief — more an aphorism.

We’ve f***ed up the world.

Sorry, I know a lot of people don’t like profanity — my wife included — but I don’t know how else to express my disappointment and disgust at our anthropocentric exceptionalism

All this noise about what we need do to avert the human-induced climate catastrophe. Are you kidding me? It’s hardly been occasioned by or brought about by the non-humans. No, they’re trying desperately to survive and failing miserably.

I know, because I’ve been around awhile, that the conversation is all about us. Hardly anyone mentions the oceans, the fields, the farmed (caged) animals, and the degradation of every living thing in the context of what they need. My sense is that much like the debate about the environment and capitalism taking equal stage, the non-humans can wait for us to sort out our death-dealing ways but of course by the time we do — which sorry to tell you, we won’t — it will be too late.

Way too late.

Previously, being the lawyer, I’d have wanted to find and promulgate a solution. I don’t have one save antinatalism but of course, no one is going to vote for non-breeding and the end of the human race. We’re far too important.

Am I deluded?

Yes.

Do I care?

No.

All I care about is nature and all other sentient life and that means I don’t have a problem with the idea of us (i.e. humanity) going extinct. If you think otherwise, fine, but you do need to square up to the fact that absent our over-developed brains, which are full to the brim with a sense of self-importance, as likely we’d be no different to the rest of nature and I don’t see them bombing each other, extracting everything that can be turned into money and all the rest of the egregious behaviour that’s followed us down the years.

I do realise how many people are invested — still — in the landscape of hope and that’s fine but I gave up on us as a species a long time ago. Perhaps it was around the time when I saw how little we cared not just about our non-human brothers and sisters but also each other. Let’s face it, we’re really not very nice.

For now, and conscious that this has grown beyond an aphorism, I’ll sign off by saying that I’m always available for a more detailed discussion on these issues, particularly the idea of antinatalism. In this regard, you might want to read (for me at least) one of the most important pieces of writing on the subject and other facets of the human condition, namely, The Last Messiah by Peter Zapffe.

Take care.

Julian